Europeans making a difference: Bosnia's Edin Dzeko is one of them

NEWS 05.02.2019 09:04
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Source: REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

Fully grounded in their tradition, doing what they love and believe in, they are making a difference every day, living the European values and inspiring new generations of Europeans to work for a stronger, more united and tolerant Europe. They are six young, talented people from the Western Balkans, telling the story of their success. Bosnia's Edin Dzeko is one of them.

“You need to work hard for everything, not just in football, you know? Nobody will give you or bring you anything on a plate,” said Bosnia's famed football player.

He started playing football right after the 1992-95 Bosnian war ended. His first football club was Sarajevo's Zeljeznicar, where he stayed until the first transfer to the Czech Republic. What followed were football clubs in Germany, England and now Italy.

“That's how it all started.”

“It's a great benefit for me to have played in so many countries since I also learned all these languages… This surely makes me a European,” says Dzeko in a video published on the official website of the European External Action Service (EEAS), the European Union's (EU) diplomatic service.

Along with five other talented Balkan people coming from all walks of life, Edin Dzeko was presented in the video as the first player ever to score 50 goals in three of Europe's major leagues, captain of the Bosnia and Herzegovina national team, a striker for Roma, and UNICEF Ambassador.

They come from the heart of Europe, from an inspiring region with tremendous potential and cultural richness where they shared their history and values, said the introductory part.

Bosnia's footballer had a wish to play for the national team. It was a dream come true when he scored in his debut game in 2007, in a Bosnia-Turkey game. “It was definitely one of the most beautiful moments in my career.”

“I get all these positive results through persistent work. That's how I'm recognised both in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Europe. That's a sign I did something positive for this country,” notes Dzeko.

He believes the better days for his country are in sight.

“I am convinced that Bosnia and Herzegovina is approaching the EU, little by little. Joining the EU would bring a lot of positive things to citizens of Bosnia and Herzegovina.”

“For athletes, in general, it would be much easier to go to Europe, and to make a huge step forward for their future in the strongest leagues in the world,” he adds.

Respect and tolerance are crucial for the future, according to him.

“The most positive way going forward is respect and tolerance between all peoples. I think this should be the main thing, and that's the only way we can go forward,” concludes Dzeko.

The article also introduces Montenegrin guitarist Milos Karadaglic, Serbian actress Hristina Popovic, Kosovo fashion designer Krenare Rugova, Albanian restaurant owner Altin Prenga and Macedonian filmmaker Milcho Manchevski.