Bosniak Presidency member: Denying Bosnia's Statehood Day is illegal

NEWS 25.11.2020 10:34
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Source: N1

Numerous delegations laid flowers today in front of the Eternal Flame memorial in Sarajevo on the occasion of November 25, the Statehood Day of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The Croat and Bosniak members of Bosnia's tripartite Presidency Zeljko Komsic and Sefik Dzaferovic sent a joint congratulatory message to citizens on the occasion of November 25 – the country's Statehood Day saying that everyone should turn to positive and constructive processes, further internal reintegration, economic development and integration into the European Union and NATO.

“Those who deny this day should actually be asked what exactly is their problem with it. There is nothing wrong with that day and with everything that happened that day regarding the equality of peoples and nations…”, said Komsic.

“What Mr Dodik and politicians from [the Serb-dominated] Republika Srpska (RS) entity are doing today is illegal. November 25 and March 1 (Independence Day) are State holidays. Bosnia's Constitutional Court confirmed this several years ago when deciding on the appeal by a group of RS MPs. It's an unquestionable thing, it is acknowledged by the entire world. We received congratulations from the President of the United States and many other statesmen. Things have to normalize in this country. We will fight and we will not give up until that happens,” said Dzaferovic.

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When asked when Bosnia would receive a State Law on National Holidays, Dzaferovic said it would happen when those denying this date finally have the political will to do so.

“They will simply have to accept historical facts,” Dzaferovic concluded.

Bosnia and Herzegovina is celebrating its Statehood Day, a date when the first State Anti-fascist Council for the National Liberation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (ZAVNOBIH) session was held in the Bosnian town of Mrkonjic-Grad, 77 years ago, when decisions on the restoration of the statehood of Bosnia and Herzegovina were made.